High Score: Netflix’s enlightening, evocative and addictive look back at gaming

High Score: Netflix's enlightening, evocative and addictive look back at gaming

REVIEW: If you’re a fan of Stranger Things or documentaries like The King of Kong and Atari: Game Over, then you’re going to love Netflix’s High Score.

It looks back at a time before the internet and cellphones. When California’s Silicon Valley was still 80 per cent prune orchids and The Muppets had their own TV show for the first time. Blockbuster movies like Jaws and Star Wars had revitalised cinemagoing, but both kids and adults were desperately seeking entertainment that was less passive.

Pong had proved the addictiveness of gaming, but only now was there a concerted effort to try and come up with the next evolution for both at home and in a public space.

High Score is must see TV for any child of the 1970s or ‘80s.

Netflix

High Score is must see TV for any child of the 1970s or ‘80s.

READ MORE:
* The best documentaries to stream right now (and where you can watch them)
* The best political movies and TV shows to stream right now –
* Drugs, murder and sex: Five sport documentaries to get you thinking
* Return of retro gaming good news for traditionalists

High Score tells the stories behind some of the world’s most (and least) popular games.

Netflix

High Score tells the stories behind some of the world’s most (and least) popular games.

France Costrel’s excellent six-part series takes an enlightening, entertaining and evocative look back at the period when video game arcades and home consoles first swept the globe.

Via a fabulous combination of impressive archive footage, cute and clever eight-bit graphic re-enactments and interviews with some of the leading lights (and a diverse range of unsung heroes) from the era, Costrel and co. tell the stories behind some of the world’s most popular games.

In just the first episode, you’ll see Tomohiro Nishikado’s original Space Invaders sketches and how its original release led to a shortage of 100 Yen coins in Japan. You’ll discover that Pac-Man was inspired by a restaurant visit and designed to attract female gamers. And you’ll hear the sad, mad story of the “worst game ever made” (“it was nothing to phone home about,” its creator jokes) – a bomb of such epic proportions it ruined Christmas and arguably, eventually destroyed Atari.

Later instalments look at the influence of Nintendo and Sega and the controversy caused by “violent games” such as Street Fighter.

Narrated by Nintendo’s Mario himself, Charles Martinet, High Score offers a potent dose of pop-culture nostalgia, greatly enhanced via a series of engrossing personal triumphs and tragedies. And that’s what makes it a must watch for any child of the 1970s and ‘80s.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Democrats, election watchdogs see ‘glaring hole’ in Postal Service pledge to roll back recent changes

Democrats, election watchdogs see ‘glaring hole’ in Postal Service pledge to roll back recent changes

Luka Doncic in Mavericks-Clippers Game 2

Luka Doncic and Dallas Mavericks flip script on Clippers